Stop, Start, Continue

If you set a New Year’s resolution this year, most likely by now, you’ve forgotten about it. Moved on, yesterday’s news. 

 

But don’t feel bad. Statistically, you are right on target – only 8% of people fulfill on their New Year’s resolutions. And the good news is – you can learn a lot from really looking at what took you out of the game.

 

While New Year’s is a time for new ideas or inspirations, I like to think of this time of year as a renewal. If you think of renewal of your resolution in the same terms we think of renewing a library book or a contract – it’s really about extending its life.

 

After a tough winter, we are gifted with warm weather, beautiful sunshine and summertime fun. It’s almost like we’ve been given a new inspiration or a new outlook. This is also a great time of year to really look at what you want out of life through that new lens.

 

A fun way to check in with your goals each week is a tool we use for team building called STOP, START and CONTINUE. I use my daybook planner to keep track of my progress and as a one-stop shop to look back on the lists I created.

 

Let’s start with STOP.

 

What are you doing that isn’t working or holding you back from creating what you want? What are you willing to give up in order to give space to the things you really want out of life?

 

As an Ontological Coach, I check in with not just what you want to stop doing, but who do you want to stop BEING? Are you choosing to be fearful, resentful or angry?  Remember – it’s a choice.

Next, look at START.

What is it that you want to start doing that you were not doing before? What actions can you start doing today that will move your projects forward?

Look also at some ways of BEING that can shift. What would shift if you start choosing from a place of joy, love or forgiveness? 

 And CONTINUE.

I have no doubt that you are already doing things that are good for you. So give yourself a big pat on the back, acknowledge yourself for all that went well this week and CONTINUE doing them.

If you do this exercise for an extended period of time, you will see the CONTINUE list grow and grow.

 

Allyson Jannotta